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dc.contributor.advisorErik Brynjolfsson.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Heekyung Hellenen_US
dc.contributor.otherSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-18T19:05:06Z
dc.date.available2013-11-18T19:05:06Z
dc.date.copyright2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/82293
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe first chapter is to investigate the impact of a free on-line repository of research articles on the diffusion of their ideas measured by the citation counts. The key questions that this chapter answers are as following: 1) does a free on-line repository of research articles increase the diffusion of their scholarly ideas measured by their citations?; 2) who benefits from the free access? By using a dataset from the Social Science Research Network (SSRN), an open repository of research articles, and employing a natural experiment that allows the effect of free access separate from other confounding factors, this study identifies the causal effect of free access on the citation counts as well as shows a heterogeneous effect of free access on both supply and demand side. The second chapter is to study the correlation between CEO pay and information technology. The hypothesis is that IT increases "effective size" of the firm that a top manager controls and thus her marginal productivity. In turn, in an efficient market, the firms with a higher degree of information technology will reward their CEOs with a higher compensation. The third chapter is to examine whether firms that emphasize decision making based on data and business analytics ("data driven decision making" or DDD) show higher performance. Using detailed survey data on the business practices and information technology investments of 179 large publicly traded firms, this study finds that firms that adopt DDD have output and productivity that is 5-6% higher than what would be expected given their other investments and information technology usage. Furthermore, the relationship between DDD and performance also appears in other performance measures such as asset utilization, return on equity and market value. Using instrumental variables methods, this study finds evidence that the effect of DDD on the productivity do not appear to be due to reverse causality. These results provide some of the first large scale data on the direct connection between data-driven decision making and firm performance.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Heekyung Hellen Kim.en_US
dc.format.extent109 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.titleThree essays in the economics of information technologyen_US
dc.title.alternative3 essays in the economics of information technologyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc861344942en_US


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