Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorRichard Schuhmann.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBingwa, Fideleen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialf-ug---en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-18T19:10:40Z
dc.date.available2013-11-18T19:10:40Z
dc.date.copyright2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/82338
dc.descriptionThesis (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 41).en_US
dc.description.abstractFlood events in the Manafwa watershed, located in eastern Uganda, have increased in frequency in recent years. The risk of flooding is increasing globally due partly to climate change which enhances the number of weather extremes like excessive rainfalls or droughts. This increase in flood events is also a response to land use changes; as more people use the land for agriculture and housing the percentage of less pervious and impervious area increases. Floods in the Manafwa watershed are often deadly and always an economic burden. In eastern Uganda there is little that can be done about climate change but land use changes can be managed. This study analyzed the impact of land use changes on floods in the Manafwa watershed in hopes of informing local leaders regarding future flood risk reduction. The analysis was conducted using a hydrologic model of the Manafwa watershed. The model had two main components: a meteorological model and a basin model. The meteorological model contained past rainfall data of the watershed and the basin model used the SCS curve number method as its soil water loss method. The curve number determines the percentage of rainfall water that becomes runoff, and is derived empirically from land use or land cover information as well as the soil type. A curve number map of the watershed was created using current land use and soil data; land use changes were modeled by making modifications to the land use map which resulted in changes on the curve number map. In addition to modeling the current land use condition, three land use changes were simulated and the outflow result showed that land use changes can affect river flow and hence flood events in the Manafwa river basin. The results also show that a land management program like reforestation could decrease the risk of flooding in the watershed.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Fidele Bingwa.en_US
dc.format.extent48 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.titleA quantitative analysis of the impact of land use changes on floods in the Manafwa River Basinen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc861696177en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record