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dc.contributor.advisorDonald E. Ingber and Roger Kamm.en_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, Jack, 1979-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-23T18:31:21Z
dc.date.available2005-08-23T18:31:21Z
dc.date.copyright2001en_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/8236
dc.descriptionThesis (S.B.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2001.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 33-34).en_US
dc.description.abstractMechanical forces are known to directly influence the structure and function of living cells in a frequency-specific manner, however, the mechanism behind this frequency sensitivity remains unknown. The effects of high frequency mechanical perturbations were investigated in cultured capillary endothelial cells using a piezoelectric actuator. The actuator was used to displace fibronectin-coated coverslip on which the cells were cultured the associated displacement of sub-cellular regions was examined using surface-bound microbeads in conjunction with real-time light microscopy and image analysis. The role of different cytoskeletal microtubules and microfilaments in the cellular response to stress was examined using specific chemical disruptors (nocodazole and cytochalasin D, respectively); the level of prestress (preexisting tension) in the cell was altered by addition of the constrictor agent, thrombin. The results showed that the experimental method is effeqtive for determining the effects of chemical disruptors on the mechanical oscillatory behavior of cells. Specifically, in the presence of nocodazole, absolute displacement of beads on cells peaked at 1100 Hz whereas it peaked at approximately 200 Hz in the presence of cytochalasin-D. Finally, error inherent in the original system was reduced by refocusing the cells and beads on the microscope and optimizing image exposure time, which both yielded more definitive results. This optimized technique may be useful for future studies analyzing changes in cell structure and cellular biochemistry in response to different frequencies of mechanical stimulation.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jack Yu.en_US
dc.format.extent78 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent3695659 bytes
dc.format.extent3695422 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleUse of a piezoelectric actuator to study the mechanical oscillatory behavior of living cellsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.oclc50218545en_US


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