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dc.contributor.advisorRebecca A. Masterson and David W. Miller.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStout, Kevin Daleen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-18T20:42:01Z
dc.date.available2013-11-18T20:42:01Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/82492
dc.descriptionThesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted and approved by the author's academic department as part of an electronic thesis pilot project. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.description"June 2013." Cataloged from department-submitted PDF version of thesisen_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 100-101).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis introduces a thermal design approach to increase thermal control system performance and decrease reliance on system resources, e.g., mass. Thermal design optimization has lagged other subsystems because the thermal subsystem is not thought to significantly drive performance or resource consumption. However, there are factors present in many spacecraft systems that invalidate this assumption. Traditional thermal design methods include point designs where experts make key component selection and sizing decisions. Thermal design optimization literature primarily focuses on optimization of the components in isolation from other parts of the thermal control system, restricting the design space considered. The collective thermal design optimization process formulates the thermal path design process as an optimization problem where the design variables are updated for each candidate design. Parametric model(s) within the optimizer predict the performance and properties of candidate designs. The thermal path parameterization captures the component interactions with each other, the system, and the space environment, and is critical to preserving the full design space. The optimal design is a thermal path with higher performance and decreased resource consumption compared to traditional thermal design methods. The REgolith X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) payload instrument serves as a case study to demonstrate the collective thermal design optimization process. First, a preliminary thermal control system model of a point design is used to determine the critical thermal path within REXIS: the thermal strap and radiator assembly. The collective thermal design optimization process is implemented on the thermal strap and radiator thermal path. Mass minimization is the objective and the REXIS detector operational temperature is a constraint to the optimization. This approach offers a 37% reduction in mass of the thermal strap and radiator assembly over a component-level optimization method.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Kevin Dale Stout.en_US
dc.format.extent144 p.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectAeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.titleDesign optimization of thermal paths in spacecraft systemsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
dc.identifier.oclc862235803en_US


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