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dc.contributor.advisorStephen D. Senturia.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVarghese, Mathew, 1973-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-23T19:19:49Z
dc.date.available2005-08-23T19:19:49Z
dc.date.copyright2001en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/8342
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, February 2002.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 80-84).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe field of MEMS has matured significantly over the last two decades increasing in both complexity and level of integration. To keep up with the demands placed by these changes requires the development of computer-aided design and modeling tools (CAD/CAM) that enable designers to reduce the time and cost it takes to produce working prototypes. An ideal scenario is one in which a designer is able to quickly model and simulate an entire microsystem - sensors, actuators and electronics -- with the certainty that their results will match that of physical prototypes. This vision of design requires the existence of system level models of MEMS devices that can capture the complex non-linear coupling between multiple physical domains, yet be sufficiently fast and compact in form to insert into a system dynamics simulator. In this thesis I explore techniques of automatically constructing such models from meshed representations of device geometry. These dynamical models are known as "reduced-order" models or "macromodels." They are characterized by few degrees of freedom (DOF), and a small set of state equations. Our process for constructing macromodels is built upon two well-established methodologies - normal mode superposition and Lagrangian mechanics. This is referred to as the "CHURN process" and was originally developed by Gabbay et al. to create models of electromechanical devices with two electrodes under conditions satisfying linear mechanics.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) In this thesis I significantly extend this process to model multi-port magnetostatic devices, multi-port electrostatic devices, and geometrically non-linear mechanical devices exhibiting stress stiffening. I also address one of the key concerns in building macromodels -- the required degree of sophistication, and the extent of involvement, of a designer in the model construction process. I propose and implement several heuristic techniques that automate the model generation process. I also apply these techniques to a fabricated microelectromechanical high frequency filter and present verification of our modeling results.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Matthew Varghese.en_US
dc.format.extent93 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent7295972 bytes
dc.format.extent7295731 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleReduced-order modeling of MEMS using modal basis functionsen_US
dc.title.alternativeReduced-order modeling of microelectromechanical systems using modal basis functionsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
dc.identifier.oclc50504486en_US


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