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dc.contributor.advisorKimberle Koile.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPeairs, Matthew (Matthew S.)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-06T15:44:07Z
dc.date.available2014-03-06T15:44:07Z
dc.date.copyright2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/85467
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Eng., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (page 35).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis project extends Classroom Learning Partner classroom interaction software to include a semantic interpretation component. This semantic interpretation, combined with existing syntactic interpretation, enables the software to tag and group student work using knowledge of the math used in both creating and solving problems. The analysis is being prototyped using student work in grades 4 and 5, with focus on multiplication and division. First, during the authoring step, the notebook author gives each page a "page definition" that encapsulates the mathematical problem presented on that page. For a multiplication or division problem, this involves setting the three numbers connected by the product relation (e.g., 6 * 3 = 18), marking which of those numbers are given by the problem or otherwise unknown, and selecting an overall context for the problem, such as equal groups or area. Then, once students have submitted their work, the analysis component takes the raw output of the syntactic interpretation step and relates it back to the mathematical content of the page to assign each student's work a set of automatically generated tags. These tags address the correctness of a student's methods and results, as well as highlighting different problem-solving strategies that students might have used to arrive at the same answer. Finally, the teacher can sort student submissions by these various tags to quickly find noteworthy or contrasting examples to present to the class.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Matthew Peairs.en_US
dc.format.extent35 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleMachine analysis of students' mathematical representations for multiplication and division problemsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
dc.identifier.oclc870969695en_US


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