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dc.contributor.advisorMartin A. Schmidt, Martha L. Gray and Mehmet Toner.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVoldman, Joelen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-23T21:31:53Z
dc.date.available2005-08-23T21:31:53Z
dc.date.copyright2001en_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/8590
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2001.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 143-152).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis presents the development of a small planar array of microfabricated traps for holding single cells and performing assays on them. The traps use the phenomenon of dielectrophoresis-the force on polarizable bodies in a non-uniform electric field-to make potential energy wells. These potential energy wells are electrically switchable, arrayable, and amenable to batch fabrication. The trapping arrays have potential use as a cytometer for monitoring the dynamics of populations of single cells and then sorting those cells based upon those dynamics. To design such traps, I have developed a modeling environment that can absolutely predict the ability of DEP-based traps to hold particles against liquid flows, which are the dominant destabilizing force in these systems. I have used the common easy-to-fabricate planar quadrupole trap to verify the accuracy of these modeling tools, and in the process determined why planar quadrupole traps behave as they do. I next used the modeling tools to design an improved quadrupole trap-the extruded quadrupole-that has the potential to hold particles lOx-100x stronger. The extruded quadrupole trap consists of a set of microfabricated gold posts arranged in a trapezoidal fashion, to ease trap loading, and includes metal substrate shunts to improve performance. The fabrication process for small arrays of these traps uses electroplating of gold into an SU-8 mold to achieve the required geometries. The final section of the thesis details experiments using small arrays of these extruded quadrupole traps. Experiments were performed with beads to verify the strong nature of the trap and then with cells to demonstrate qualitative operation of the arrays and the ability to perform dynamic fluorescent assays on multiple single cells followed by sorting. The technology is now well poised to enable the development of biological assays that are currently unavailable.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Joel Voldman.en_US
dc.format.extent152 p.en_US
dc.format.extent20395825 bytes
dc.format.extent20395581 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleA microfabricated dielectrophoretic trapping array for cell-based biological assaysen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc49279438en_US


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