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dc.contributor.advisorRichard J. Gilbert.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNapadow, Vitaly J., 1971-en_US
dc.contributor.otherHarvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-23T21:50:38Z
dc.date.available2005-08-23T21:50:38Z
dc.date.copyright2001en_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/8628
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Harvard--Massachusetts Institute of Technology Division of Health Sciences and Technology, 2001.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 147-154).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe human tongue is a versatile, lithe and structurally complex muscular organ that is of paramount importance for many physiological tasks. The lingual musculature is composed of various orthogonally oriented myofiber populations. Furthermore, coupling this knowledge of tissue myoarchitecture with patterns of regional deformation offers the ability to explore complex structure-function relationships in the organ. Tongue myoarchitecture was studied with Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTI), which derived the spatial diffusion tensor field in the tongue. Since, diffusivity relates directly to myofiber orientation, this in vivo technique successfully produced a virtual anatomical atlas. In order to relate this 3D myoarchitecture to physiological deformations, in vivo strain was quantified by an MRI tagging technique. This technique tagged lingual tissue with a rectilinear grid, which was subsequently imaged to track and quantify deformation through 3D strain measures. Anterior protrusion, sagittal bending, and oral stage deglutition were studied with this technique. The results demonstrated that synergistic co-contraction between various muscle populations produced the necessary deformations in global tongue shape. In order to delineate specific muscular contributions to sagittal bending, the tongue was modeled by a thermal bimetal strip analog wherein thermal contraction approximated muscle fiber activation.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) The results confirmed our hypothesis that sagittal bending resulted from synergistic co-contraction of two distinct myofiber populations. In conclusion, tongue deformation is intimately related to the lingual musculature, and our results confirm the characterization of the tongue as a muscular hydrostat - an organ whose musculature produces deformation as well as the structural support for that deformation.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Vitaly J. Napadow.en_US
dc.format.extent148 p.en_US
dc.format.extent13414225 bytes
dc.format.extent13413981 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectHarvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.en_US
dc.titleA biomechanical investigation of the structure--function relationships in the human tongueen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentHarvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc49544689en_US


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