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dc.contributor.advisorSeymour Papert.en_US
dc.contributor.authorUmaschi Bers, Marinaen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-23T22:32:06Z
dc.date.available2005-08-23T22:32:06Z
dc.date.copyright2001en_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/8708
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, 2001.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 204-212).en_US
dc.description.abstractWe live in a society where concepts of self, community and what is right and wrong are constantly changing. This makes it particularly challenging for young people to construct a sense of self and to identify and develop their most cherished personal and moral values. It also puts pressure on schools and society to help them do so. This thesis explores how new technologies can be used to create environments explicitly designed to help young people explore their inner worlds. I coined the term identity construction environments (ICE) to refer to computational tools purposefully designed with the goal of helping young people explore different aspects of the self, in particular personal and moral values. My contribution in this thesis involves three dimensions: theory, design and empirical research. At the theoretical level, I propose a framework through which people can think and learn about identity as a complex entity embracing multiple and contradictory values. At the design level, I describe an evolutionary process of building and investigating the use of three identity construction environments which are precursors to the one that is at the center of the empirical investigation described in this thesis.en_US
dc.description.abstract(cont.) The three-dimensional multi-user environment I call Zora engages learners in the design of a graphical virtual city and its social organization. At the empirical level I present two studies of young people using Zora: a multicultural group of teenagers in an intensive summer workshop, and young patients in the Dialysis Unit at Boston Children's Hospital. Despite their diversity, both populations demonstrated a desire and need to explore issues of identity and values. The first study looks at how teens used Zora to express their sense of self, to create a participatory community to discuss ethical and moral issues, and to explore the relationship between personal identity and moral values. The second study focuses on how pediatric patients used Zora to escape the harshness of the dialysis treatment and to create a network to facilitate mutual support and new kinds of interactions with hospital staff. This thesis offers a theoretical framework and methodology for education in multicultural, moral and democratic values and for the potential role of computational environments in psychotherapeutic interventions.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityMarina Umaschi Bers.en_US
dc.format.extent221 p.en_US
dc.format.extent17937150 bytes
dc.format.extent17936911 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectArchitecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.titleIdentity construction environments : the design of computational tools for exploring a sense of self and moral valuesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc49849693en_US


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