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dc.contributor.advisorPeter Roth.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShore, Zachary, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Center for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Development.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-02T19:28:52Z
dc.date.available2014-06-02T19:28:52Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/87610
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Real Estate Development, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Real Estate Development in conjunction with the Center for Real Estate, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 84-94).en_US
dc.description.abstractTaking an analytical approach, this thesis will address how the unmet housing need of urban single-person households can be rectified by the introduction of micro-apartments. The existing housing stock has been built largely based on the needs of a historically stable demand for family housing. By 2025, the number of single households will equal the number of households containing families with children. Given the remarkable increase in single-person households over the past few decades, a significant gap has formed in the availability of properly priced housing to meet the needs of people who would prefer to live alone. This affordability gap is an opportunity for cities to take strain off of family housing, stimulate the economy, and create innovative housing types that satisfy the needs of their fastest growing demographic. With land and labor costs at an all-time high, apartments with less square footage-micro-apartments- are a viable solution to filling the supply gap for single-person households. This thesis first analyzes this mismatch between supply and demand; introduces micro-apartments as a logical approach to ease the strain on housing; evaluates barriers and alternative theories that delay the implementation of this logical solution; and finally, makes recommendations for planners and policymakers to successfully add micro-apartments to their menu of housing options. The growth in single-person households with various levels of income indicates a significant demand for small units of modest means. Micro-apartments offer the opportunity to live alone to a variety of people, including new arrivals to cities, young professionals, and people at transitional stages in life such as a recent divorcée or a young couple. By offering housing to these segments of demand, micro-apartments will implicitly lessen the strain of existing housing stock intended for families.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Zachary Shore.en_US
dc.format.extent94 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectCenter for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Development.en_US
dc.titleThe case for micro-apartment housing in growing urban centersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Real Estate Developmenten_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Center for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Development.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Center for Real Estate
dc.identifier.oclc879664439en_US


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