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dc.contributor.advisorSteven Leeb and James Roberge.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDenison, Timothy Allman, 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-23T15:26:11Z
dc.date.available2005-08-23T15:26:11Z
dc.date.copyright2000en_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/8800
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2000.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p. 195-205).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this thesis is the development of a nanoscale Coulter counter for the direct electrical detection of specific genetic sequences of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA); the general approach used to accomplish sequence recognition is a refinement of the resistive pulse technique. Commercial Coulter counters fabricated with sub-micrometer apertures can size particles with roughly twenty nanometers of resolution. The characterization of DNA, which is more than an order of magnitude smaller than this resolution limit, requires the development of a detection system with a two nanometer limiting aperture. To help develop the techniques and instrumentation explored in this thesis, the biological toxin, alpha hemolysin, was implemented as "prototype" limiting aperture. With the practical knowledge gained from using a toxin channel, a general model for the nanopore as a low-noise sensor was developed. With this model, two broad goals were achieved. The first achievement was the development of novel genetic recognition strategies that exploit the properties of the nanopore within the limitations imposed by DNA structure and existing channel geometries. The second achievement was the design and prototyping of novel interface picoammeter for the measurement of the current fluctuations associated with DNA translocation through a nanopore. Although the instrumentation and methods developed in this thesis are limited to genetic sequence recognition, the hope is that elements of this work will be integrated with the development of silicon nanopores to achieve rapid de novo DNA sequencing in the future.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Timothy Allman Denison.en_US
dc.format.extent274 p.en_US
dc.format.extent18383330 bytes
dc.format.extent18383089 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titleThe development of a nanoscale Coulter counter for rapid genetic sequence recognitionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
dc.identifier.oclc48229117en_US


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