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dc.contributor.advisorIan W. Hunter.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMadden, John David Wyndham, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-19T16:56:32Z
dc.date.available2008-05-19T16:56:32Z
dc.date.copyright2000en_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/8820
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2000.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractConducting polymers are unusual organic materials featuring high electronic conductivity. Recently it has been observed that some of these polymers change in dimension when their oxidation state is altered. Dimensional changes induced by electrochemical activation in the conducting polymer polypyrrole are investigated. Swept sine and step voltage and current inputs are employed to investigate the nature of this electro-mechanical coupling. Strains of up to 6 %, strain rates of 4 %/s, power to mass ratios of 40 W/kg and forces of up to 34 MN/m2 are achieved. Polypyrrole nearly equals mammalian skeletal muscle in power to mass and exceeds it in force by two orders of magnitude. A model is developed which predicts the electrochemical impedance, and relates electrical input to mechanical output. Observations and modeling indicate that diffusion and capacitive charging limit strain rate. The use of thinner films is predicted to increase strain rate and power to mass ratios by at least two orders of magnitude. Initial applications are likely to be in microelectromechanical systems.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby John David Wyndham Madden.en_US
dc.format.extent2 v. (355 leaves)en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMechanical Engineering.en_US
dc.titleConducting polymer actuatorsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.identifier.oclc48368739en_US


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