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dc.contributor.advisorPierre Ghisbain and Jerome J. Connor.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGamaniouk, Tarasen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T19:37:17Z
dc.date.available2014-09-19T19:37:17Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/89848
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Eng., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (page 53).en_US
dc.description.abstractProgressive collapse has become a topic of interest in recent years leading to a greater focus on the resilience of structures. The propagation of a local failure can become catastrophic and lead to multiple deaths, injuries and destruction of property. These types of events have been predominant in mid to high-rise buildings under both accidental and intentional circumstances. The dire consequences associated with these types of buildings have fueled research efforts into preventative measures for progressive collapse. Three main design methods have been implemented for the design of progressive collapse: tie forces, enhanced local resistance and alternate load path. Each method features its own advantages and disadvantages; however, the alternate load path is currently the preferred procedure as it is accurate and capable of dealing with complex systems. This method is investigated in detail with a specific focus on nonlinear dynamic analysis. The technique is applied for three different structural systems which are commonly used for high-rise buildings: moment frames, braced frames and truss tube systems. A variety of 2D structural models are analysed for their performance under progressive collapse conditions with variable building parameters. The results of the investigation infer that taller buildings are inherently better at preventing progressive collapse as the load is diminished throughout the building allowing less plastic hinges to form. This result was common in all three structural models with the braced frames exhibiting a better structural response to local failure in comparison to moment frame buildings. The study identifies the advantage of implementing hybrid structural frames for the prevention of collapse in high-rise buildings. Integration of moment frames for the lower stories of buildings is shown to be an effective mitigation method for progressive collapse.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Taras Gamaniouk.en_US
dc.format.extent57 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.titleParametric analysis of progressive collapse in high-rise buildingsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc890135822en_US


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