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dc.contributor.advisorJoseph F. Coughlin.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Chaiwooen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T19:38:47Z
dc.date.available2014-09-19T19:38:47Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/89872
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 229-240).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe aging of the population is an important global phenomenon that is bringing changes and challenges to various areas of society. Technology has been explored as one way to cope with the complexities and uncertainties that are emerging with this demographic change. However, the responses from the potential user segment have been far from enthusiastic, suggesting that older adults' adoption of technology is not simply a matter of performance and price, but a complex issue that is affected by multiple factors. This dissertation explores the topic of older adults' technology adoption and use with an integrated framework that includes the perceptions, behaviors, and decisions of both the users and the producers. First, an exhaustive set of individual, technical, and social factors are identified and defined from a literature review and from user interviews with descriptions on these factors' importance and roles in the adoption and use process. Second, the results from a large-scale national survey are presented with a discussion of the empirical validity of the factors, as well as their relative importance and associations at three main decision stages of adoption and use -- purchase, initial use, and continued use. Finally, this dissertation presents a set of three cases developed from multiple sources of evidence on existing technology-enabled solutions for aging-in-place. The integrated framework described in this dissertation suggests the importance of considering population aging as a complex issue, as well as a new opportunity, that requires user-centered thinking from various players and stakeholders. Drawing on multiple methods of quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis, the results underscore the importance and roles of different adoption factors during the design, development, and delivery of technology, as well as in older adults' decisions around adoption and use. This dissertation finds that the various requirements, expectations, and values of older adults are closely related and collectively affect their decisions and behaviors around technology. Finally, a set of implications for research and practice are presented around the need for the continuous involvement of older adults throughout design, development, and delivery of technologies for a changing population.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Chaiwoo Lee.en_US
dc.format.extent280 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.titleUser-centered system design in an aging society : an integrated study on technology adoptionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division
dc.identifier.oclc890206071en_US


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