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dc.contributor.advisorVladimir Bulovic.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMacko, Jill Annette (Jill Annette Rowehl)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T21:30:59Z
dc.date.available2014-09-19T21:30:59Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/89956
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 147-164).en_US
dc.description.abstractMore than two billion people in the world have little or no access to electricity. To be empowered they need robust and lightweightrenewable energy conversion technologies that can be easily transported with high yield from our manufacturing centers to their (often) rural homes. Few conventional photovoltaic technologies are robust enough to fill this need, however organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are ideal candidates due to their potential to be ultra-lightweight and flexible. However, this promising technology is currently limited by its relatively low power conversion efficiencies. This doctoral dissertation seeks to speed the eming of this promising technology. As a proof of concept for the accessibility and ultra-lightweight of OPVs, we integrate vapor-processed carbon-based electrodes and sub-30nm-thin encapsulations in organic photovoltaics, leading to the demonstration of monolithic, robust solar cell arrays as well as the first ever solar cells fabricated directly on paper. Furthermore, we have developed and advanced two unconventional approaches to enhancing power conversion efficiency via conventional methods: (1) optimization of multijunction efficiency via computational optical interference modeling and subcell photocurrent balance quantization and control, and (2) novel implementation of conventional vapor processing methods in the formation of molecular semiconductor crystals. This work has confirmed the potential of carbon-based materials to enable robust, ultra-lightweight, efficient solar arrays, thus advancing their capacity to empower our brothers and sisters even at the ends of the earth.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jill Annette (Rowehl) Macko.en_US
dc.format.extent164 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleNanostructural engineering of vapor-processed organic photovoltaics for efficient solar energy conversion from any Surfaceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc890128432en_US


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