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dc.contributor.advisorWilliam Uricchio.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZhong, Lingyuxiuen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Comparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T21:32:08Z
dc.date.available2014-09-19T21:32:08Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/89975
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Comparative Media Studies, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 90-101).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the early twentieth century, the emergence of national market and maturation of color printing technologies brought a revolution in advertising. Consumers received and collected many colorful advertising images and pasted them into scrapbooks. Nowadays, a group of visually-driven social commerce sites like Pinterest.com provides a platform on which both businesses and consumer-collectors publish, collect, and circulate images en masse. This thesis examines historical scrapbooks as well as a variety of Pinterest collections through the theoretical lens of sociology to determine whether Pinterest enables new modes of collection, consumption and community formation. This thesis shows that while collections of commercial images of products are often spaces in which we express consumer desires for products and engage in hedonistic imaginative play, the socially-networked nature of Pinterest allows a new type of malleable, global and taste-based community to develop that can engage in collective imaginative play.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Lingyuxiu Zhong.en_US
dc.format.extent101 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectComparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.titleMy pins are my dreams : Pinterest, collective daydreams, and the aspirational gapen_US
dc.title.alternativePinterest, collective daydreams, and the aspirational gapen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Comparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMIT Comparative Media Studies/Writing
dc.identifier.oclc890129765en_US


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