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dc.contributor.advisorThomas Eagar.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMarks, Jordan (Jordan Christine)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T21:32:11Z
dc.date.available2014-09-19T21:32:11Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/89976
dc.descriptionThesis: S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis. Vita.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (page 46).en_US
dc.description.abstractInorganic adhesives have several benefits over traditional joining methods for joining electrical steels used in magnetic cores of numerous industrial applications. As insulators with very high melting temperatures, the adhesives offer the possibility of increasing the efficiency of these machines. The aim of this project was to characterize sodium silicates as adhesives for such applications and develop methodology for their processing. The chemical and physical properties of the water-soluble sodium silicates were easily altered by changing the composition of Na₂O, SiO₄, and water, offering a spectrum of properties to investigate. Several aspects of the electrical steel provided by POSCO were also investigated, including surface chemistry and microstructure due to processing of the steel sheets. Coating efficacy was evaluated based on the adhesive's ability to wet the substrate to form a uniform coating, as well as resistance to mechanical loads, including adhesion and flexural strain. Greater degree of alkalinity in the sodium silicates resulted in improved wetting, uniformity, adhesion, and flexural strain for the range of viscosities that supported these behaviors. The microstructure of the electrical steels influenced the interaction of the adhesive with the surface, but properties still improved with higher alkalinity. Firing parameters were used to alter the mechanical properties of the silicates, as well as to determine operability limits. The best mechanical properties occurred for those coupons fired between 600°C and 800°C. The efficacy did not degrade significantly with long exposure to high temperatures, offering promise for sodium orthosilicates as appropriate adhesives for the described applications. Further study of the environmental conditions under which the adhesives will be used, as well as full characterization of the insulating properties will allow the processes developed here to be scaled up for industrial use.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jordan Marks.en_US
dc.format.extent48 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleDevelopment of sodium silicate adhesives for electrical steel bondingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc890129780en_US


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