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dc.contributor.advisorSusan Murcott.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKnutson, Jason R. (Jason Richard)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialf-gh---en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-19T21:35:02Z
dc.date.available2014-09-19T21:35:02Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/90023
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Eng., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 133-137).en_US
dc.description.abstractIt is estimated that 2.5 billion people lack access to improved sanitation, and 90% of wastewater in developing countries is discharged into the environment without any treatment. However, the construction of sewerage systems and centralized wastewater treatment plants is neither an affordable nor appropriate solution for many areas. Therefore, an emphasis has arisen on decentralized sanitation technologies that treat waste on-site and recover resources that can be used to generate economic gains. Using a case study method and an evaluation matrix, this thesis evaluates the efficacy and scalability of several such innovative sanitation technologies. The decentralized technologies evaluated include the Clean Team Toilet, Microbial Fuel Cell Latrine, Biofil Toilet, Microflush Toilet, and the more traditional pour-flush toilet. Two semi-centralized technologies, the IMWI Fortifer pellets and Ashesi University's small-scale wastewater treatment system with anaerobic digestion, were studied as well. Case studies of these technologies were conducted in January 2014 in Ghana and involved surveys of users and interviews of service providers and their competition where possible. The evaluations were completed using this information and were guided by criteria on sanitation outcomes, business management, and technology categories. We conclude that the Biofil Toilet is the current gold standard for decentralized sanitation, although it is costly. The locally sourced Microflush Toilet is recommended for middle- and low-income families and small aid projects, for it functions similarly to the Biofil Toilet but is approximately one-fifth the cost. For large projects in densely populated areas, the Clean Team Toilet is recommended if a reuse for waste and safe disposal of biocide can be established. Other technologies require further development before they can be recommended for implementation and use.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jason R. Knutson.en_US
dc.format.extent156 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.titleEvaluation of innovative decentralized sanitation technologies in Ghanaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc890137679en_US


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