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dc.contributor.advisorDavid Simchi-Levi.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKyratzoglou, loannis Men_US
dc.contributor.otherSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-08T15:22:51Z
dc.date.available2014-10-08T15:22:51Z
dc.date.copyright2013en_US
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/90688
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Engineering and Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, System Design and Management Program, 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (page 83).en_US
dc.description.abstractAfter an exodus of jobs in the last few years, the U.S. is committed to improving its manufacturing competiveness by investing in manufacturing innovation and increasing its labor force productivity. With rising labor costs in China and the current economic recession in Europe the timing could not be better for the U.S. to surge forward to gain back its competitive edge. These advantages along with the expected U.S. shale oil energy boom create an attractive opportunity for U.S. companies to re-shore their operations. This empirical manufacturing study analyzes the survey responses from a large number of companies with global manufacturing footprint and examines whether U.S. companies consider re-shoring their operations. The results show that a significant proportion, 33.6 percent of the U.S. companies are "considering" bringing manufacturing back to the U.S., while 15 percent of U.S companies are "definitely" planning to re-shore to the U.S. This is a very insightful finding and it shows that the re-shoring trend is picking up speed. We used the survey data to identify what drives this trend and whether this trend has made an impact. Competition in the manufacturing industry is instigating companies to reduce their supply chain costs. To retain their competiveness, companies are responding by implementing strategies such as lean manufacturing, outsourcing and offshoring. However, these strategies have significantly increased the company's exposure to supply chain risks. For example, lean manufacturing means lower inventory levels, and a high risk incident can cause a major disruption in operations. Similarly, as outsourcing and offshoring operations grow, supply chains become geographically dispersed and exposed to various types of risks. As a result, many companies are concerned about their supply chain resilience but only a few are effectively managing risk. Therefore, companies need to plan their supply chain strategy to effectively respond to various risks. This empirical study develops a framework to characterize the supply chain risk maturity level of each company. We then apply the maturity model to examine resiliency and operational effectiveness. The results offer a number of important insights: For example, companies with mature supply chain and risk management processes are more resilient than immature ones. The operational insights gained by this research can help companies manage today's challenges and prepare for tomorrow's opportunities.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby loannis M. Kyratzoglou.en_US
dc.format.extent83 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.subjectSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.titleAn empirical analysis of manufacturing re-shoring and supply chain risken_US
dc.title.alternativeSupply chain risk maturity evaluation framework for global organizationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Engineering and Managementen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc890939483en_US


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