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dc.contributor.advisorBruce Cameron.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRajwani, Shakeelen_US
dc.contributor.otherSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-08T15:25:04Z
dc.date.available2014-10-08T15:25:04Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/90722
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Engineering and Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, System Design and Management Program, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 73-74).en_US
dc.description.abstractPlatforming, the sharing of parts, processes, knowledge, and technologies, across products and projects has proven to be an effective way for firms to reduce their costs. While platforming is now common in many consumer and industrial products, the use of platforms is a relatively new practice in the design of civil and industrial projects such as buildings, power grids, and oil and gas facilities. The research in this thesis was specifically undertaking to examine the use of platforming and commonality in the oil and gas industry. The first objective of this thesis was to understand which platforming benefits were applicable to oil and gas, and to discover the extent of the platform benefits. This was accomplished by studying commonality on an oil and gas project, codenamed Steambird, at an unconventional oil company over a period of 10 months. The secondary objective was to propose a framework for commonality and platforming applicable to oil and gas based on the findings from the Steambird case study. Significant commonality benefits were found in the case study, including a 35% reduction in engineering effort, faster production ramp-up, and a reduction in operational sparing requirements. However, these benefits were relatively modest, only totaling about 10% of the overall project cost. Greater benefits would have likely have been possible but not realized due to organizational factors. The cost structure of the project, dominated by construction and third party procurements, also reduced the potential for commonality benefits. An alternative platform approach to commonality is suggested for future development of the Steambird project. The proposed platform includes 3 well pad variant designs with 6, 9, and 12 wells for low, medium, and high production. A development strategy using the suggested variants was shown to have lower costs than Steambirds current strategy even under conservative assumptions. Finally, the platform strategy proposed for Steambird is generalized to oil and gas development in general.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Shakeel Rajwani.en_US
dc.format.extent79 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectEngineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.subjectSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.titleBenefits and applications of commonality and platforming in the oil and gas industryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Engineering and Managementen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Engineering Systems Division.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSystem Design and Management Program.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc891138498en_US


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