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dc.contributor.advisorRenée Green.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKuo, Ryan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-04T20:28:39Z
dc.date.available2014-11-04T20:28:39Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/91302
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Art, Culture and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 62-65).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis concerns the body as it faces the computer. While it is informed by theories of embodiment, it argues against a retreat to the "human" in the face of new sensations that may result from the body's willing incorporation into the computer as an avatar. At the same time, the processes of self-virtualization enabled by computation are subject to question. Extending from the author's practice as an artist working in interactive media, digital video, sound, and writing, this work posits that both human and computer compete for agency in the active construction of meaning. Rather than locate this construction in either a perceptual or an algorithmic process, the encounter with the computer is described as a vibration. This allows both human and computer to be considered as affective bodies prior to signification. The vibration between these bodies is a form of movement opened by interrupting the process of signification that occurs when the computer renders code; the user responds to the computer's output; and rendering, response, and interaction are all read discursively. Both interruption and vibration are theorized here in relation to Merleau-Ponty, Virilio, Lyotard, Goodman, Hansen, Barthes, Beckett, Cézanne, Plato, and other theorists and practitioners.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Ryan Kuo.en_US
dc.format.extent65 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleMaterializing the holeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Art, Culture and Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc893559438en_US


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