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dc.contributor.advisorFrédo Durand.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, Kenny Hen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-24T18:38:42Z
dc.date.available2014-11-24T18:38:42Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/91836
dc.descriptionThesis: M. Eng., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 50-51).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe boom in online education has provided for the potential of a personalized lecture experience for every single student. These recorded lectures provide a major benefit to both students and authors, but currently present several drawbacks as well. The limitations that exist stem from the method in which lectures are created: using video recorders. Video recordings inherently limit the editing capabilities of an author and constrain the interaction from students, providing for a poor choice of media. An alternative encoding of a lecture could provide for a much fuller feature set to users on both sides of a lecture. The Pentimento system was designed to promote the expedited creation of hand-drawn lecture notes for online education platforms such as edX or Coursera. By decoupling the visual and audio domains of a lecture, content creators are able to more freely fix mistakes or change small portions without the need to re-record the correct portions. Small recordings are pieced together to give the final lecture, where the correct synchronization of edits among the lecture is handled by the system, and the lecture appears to have been seamlessly recorded in one session. Full control of the data also allows for the potential of increased interactivity from students.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Kenny H. Lam.en_US
dc.format.extent51 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectElectrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.titlePentimento : retroactive editing for lecturesen_US
dc.title.alternativeRetroactive editing for lecturesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM. Eng.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc894235989en_US


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