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dc.contributor.advisorChristopher Schmandt.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Wu-Hsien_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-24T18:41:53Z
dc.date.available2014-11-24T18:41:53Z
dc.date.copyright2013en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/91876
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, February 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 137-143).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation research, we explore ways of using audio on AR applications, as it is especially suitable for mobile users when their eyes and hands are not necessarily available and they have limited attention capacity. While most previous mobile AR audio systems were mostly tested in sparse audio maps, we want to create a system that can be challenged by a city load of information. We design and implement Loco-Radio, a mobile augmented reality audio browsing system. It uses GPS and a geomagnetic-based sensing module to provide outdoor and indoor location sensing. To enhance the audio browsing experience in high-density spatialized audio environments, we introduce auditory spatial scaling, which enables users or the system to adjust the spatial density of perceived sounds based on context. The audio comes from a custom geo-tagged audio database, which contains a set of channels designed for different use cases. In the first scenario, iconic music is assigned to represent restaurants. As users move in the city, they encounter a series of songs and the perception enhances their awareness of the numbers, styles, and locations of restaurants. It is tested by car drivers, bikers, and pedestrians. In the second scenario, audio clips of media lab research demos are tagged around the building. As a result, users can participate in an augmented reality audio lab tours. We argue that AR audio systems should consider not only where users are but also how they move. Discussion will be focus on strategies of using spatial audio in high-density audio environments and how they should change in different moving modes.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Wu-Hsi Li.en_US
dc.format.extent143 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.titleLoco-Radio : designing high-density augmented reality audio browsersen_US
dc.title.alternativeDesigning high-density augmented reality audio browsersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc894358129en_US


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