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dc.contributor.advisorAngela M. Belcher.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLiau, Forrest (Forrest W.)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-08T18:09:24Z
dc.date.available2014-12-08T18:09:24Z
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/92064
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, June 2013.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis. "June 2013."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractDense networks of high aspect ratio nanowires can provide important functionality to electronic devices through a unique combination of electronic and structural properties including high conductivity, high surface area, and tunable porosity. In this thesis, we explore the virus-enabled synthesis and two/three-dimensional assembly of metallic and semiconducting nanowire networks for future applications including batteries and solar cells. In Chapter 2, we describe the virus-enabled synthesis of titanium oxide nanowires and their incorporation in layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte assemblies for use in dye sensitized solar cells. In Chapter 3, we describe a two-dimensional network of virus-templated cobalt oxide nanowires integrated into ultrathin microbatteries via soft lithography. In Chapter 4, we describe a three-dimensional porous virus-only aerogel network and demonstrate a virus-assembled metal nanowire network for use in batteries. Finally, in Chapter 5, the mechanical properties of various virus assembled three-dimensional structures are measured and compared. We hereby expand the virus assembly toolkit and demonstrate the versatility of bioengineered materials templates.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Forrest W. Liau.en_US
dc.format.extent155 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleVirus-enabled synthesis and 2D/3D assembly of nanowire networksen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc896878083en_US


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