Advanced Search
DSpace@MIT

Justification of village scale photovoltaic powered electrodialysis desalination systems for rural India

Research and Teaching Output of the MIT Community

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Amos G. Winter, V. en_US
dc.contributor.author Wright, Natasha C. (Natasha Catherine) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial a-ii--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2014-12-08T18:49:56Z
dc.date.available 2014-12-08T18:49:56Z
dc.date.copyright 2014 en_US
dc.date.issued 2014 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/92115
dc.description Thesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 2014. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (pages 67-74). en_US
dc.description.abstract This thesis justifies photovoltaic (PV)-powered electrodialysis (ED) as an energy and cost-effective means of desalinating groundwater in rural India and presents the design requirements for a village-level system. Saline groundwater, which underlies 60% of India, can negatively impact health as well as cause a water source to be discarded because of its taste. A quarter of India's population lives in villages of 2000-5000 people, many of whom do not have reliable access to electricity. Most village-scale, ongrid desalination plants use reverse osmosis (RO), which is economically unviable in off-grid locations. Technical and ethnographic factors are used to develop an argument for PV-ED for rural locations, including: system capacity, biological and chemical contaminant removal; water aesthetics; recovery ratio; energy source; economics of water provision; maintenance; and the energetic and cost considerations of available technologies. Within the salinity range of groundwater in India, ED requires less specific energy than RO (75% less at 1,000 ppm and 30% less at 3,000 ppm). At 2,000 ppm, this energetic scaling translates to a 50% lower PV power system cost for ED versus RO. PV-ED has the potential to greatly expand the reach of desalination units for rural India. Additionally, a theoretical model for an electrodialysis system is presented and validated through experimental trials. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Natasha C. Wright. en_US
dc.format.extent 76 pages en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.title Justification of village scale photovoltaic powered electrodialysis desalination systems for rural India en_US
dc.title.alternative Justification of village scale PV powered ED desalination systems for rural India en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 895873241 en_US


Files in this item

Name Size Format Description
895873241-MIT.pdf 7.104Mb PDF Full printable version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

MIT-Mirage