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dc.contributor.advisorAlan Lightman.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrownell, Lindsay Kirlinen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-05T19:59:52Z
dc.date.available2015-01-05T19:59:52Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/92629
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Science Writing, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Humanities, Graduate Program in Science Writing, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 23-24).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn today's increasingly digitized, data-driven world, the "old ways" of doing things, especially science, are quickly abandoned in favor of newer, ostensibly better methods. One such discipline is the ancient study of taxonomy, the discovery and organization of life on Earth. New techniques like DNA sequencing are allowing taxonomists to gain insight into the tangled web of relationships between species (among the Acanthomorph fish, for example). But is the newest, shiniest toy always the best? Are we in danger of losing vital information about the world if we abandon the thousands of years of cumulative human knowledge to gather dust in basements? This thesis explores the current crossroads at which taxonomy finds itself, and offers a solution to preserve the past while diving headlong into the future.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Lindsay Kirlin Brownell.en_US
dc.format.extent26 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectGraduate Program in Science Writing.en_US
dc.titleOne fish, two fish, lungfish, youfish : embracing traditional taxonomy in a molecular worlden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Science Writingen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Theses Program in Science Writing
dc.contributor.departmentMIT Program in Writing & Humanistic Studies
dc.identifier.oclc897735260en_US


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