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dc.contributor.advisorLeslie Keith Norford.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFennessy, Kristian (Kristian M.)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-05T20:01:14Z
dc.date.available2015-01-05T20:01:14Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/92642
dc.descriptionThesis: S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 66-69).en_US
dc.description.abstractCurrently, the United States alone is responsible for approximately twenty percent of the world's total energy consumption. This consumption is equivalent to roughly 100 quadrillion Btu of energy, or in plainer terms, over $1 trillion in energy expenditures annually. This sector alone comprises nearly half of all the energy consumed in the United States. Additionally, about seventy-five percent of all electricity produced in the U.S. is consumed by building operations. This precedent has convinced me that finding an alternative is worth the investment. The purpose of my thesis project is to explore substitutes to mechanical heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) building systems. My project revisits the concept of natural ventilation and explores and evaluates its feasibility as an energy-saving and comfortable alternative to mechanical ventilation systems. Additionally, my project focuses on how buildings can be designed to naturally condition the indoor environments of our buildings. More specifically, I would like to help architects discover how they can utilize natural ventilation effectively. Using the TRNSYS simulation environment, I methodically show how a designer would use TRNSYS to make informed decisions about natural ventilation in their designs. My research is meant to be a valuable tool for other designers who are unsure or uncomfortable with utilizing this natural process to condition their buildings. The final deliverable of my thesis project is a comprehensive strategy for designers to incorporate natural ventilation in the early stages of their building design.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Kristian Fennessy.en_US
dc.format.extent69 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleAddressing the problem with natural ventilation : producing a guide for designers to integrate natural ventilation into the early stages of building designen_US
dc.title.alternativeProducing a guide for designers to integrate natural ventilation into the early stages of building designen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.B.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture
dc.identifier.oclc898125184en_US


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