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dc.contributor.advisorFrederick Salvucci.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChingcuanco, Franco (Franco Felipe)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-05T20:01:56Z
dc.date.available2015-01-05T20:01:56Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/92649
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Transportation and in Technology and Policy, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2014.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 115-128).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis makes three related contributions to the broad literature on congestion pricing. First, it examines three policy dimensions that underlie pricing: the economic arguments that motivate it, the technological options that enable it, and the equity concerns raised by its implementation. The thesis unites these dimensions and shows that not only can they be in tension with each other, but they also collectively affect pricing's public acceptance. Second, a new framework is proposed that roots the public rejection of congestion pricing along the dimensions of inequity and uncertainty, influenced by societal views and institutional issues. Using this framework, a number of political problems including collective action, credible commitment, free riding and loss aversion are posed as specific combinations of perceived inequity and uncertainty about congestion pricing's benefits and costs. Societal views are then shown to moderate the public's sentiment about this policy. Afterwards, this framework is linked to institutional issues, particularly the political process that could constrain and block the approval of a congestion pricing program. Finally, the thesis evaluates the effectiveness of pricing as a policy tool. The impacts of congestion pricing-both positive and negative-are first considered. Afterwards, the thesis compares pricing to a small subset of other congestion mitigation options, including taxing vehicle miles traveled, regulating automobile ownership, and regulating and taxing parking supply. The revenue generating potential of these tools is also reviewed. Throughout the thesis, evidence is drawn from both successful (e.g., London, Stockholm and Singapore) and failed (e.g., New York City, Edinburgh, Manchester and Hong Kong) attempts to introduce congestion pricing. The research concludes by delineating a number of important considerations when exploring pricing as an option to mitigate traffic congestion.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Franco Chingcuanco.en_US
dc.format.extent128 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectCivil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.titleCongestion pricing : policy dimensions, public rejection and impactsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Transportation and in Technology and Policyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
dc.identifier.oclc898128657en_US


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