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dc.contributor.advisorH. Robert Horvitz.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMetzstein, Mark M. (Mark Mordecai), 1969-en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-19T19:16:21Z
dc.date.available2005-08-19T19:16:21Z
dc.date.copyright1998en_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/9661
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Biology, 1999.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.description.abstractProgrammed cell death is an important process regulating cell number in the development of all animals. Two genes, ces-1 and ces-2 control programmed cell death in a subset of developing neurons in C. elegans. To understand how ces-1 and ces-2 might act to regulate programmed cell death, we have cloned these genes. We find that both ces-1 and ces-2 encode transcription factors. By sequence and DNA-binding specificity CES-1 is a member of the Snail family of zinc-finger proteins, and most similar to the Drosophila protein Scratch. CES-2 is a bZIP protein closest in sequence and DNA-binding specificity to members of the vertebrate PAR subfamily. We have analyzed ces-1 regulation and, by conservation in the related nematode C. briggsae and by the position of the ces-1 gain-of-function mutations, identified a putative control element 5' of ces-1 coding sequences. This element contains a site that can be bound by CES-2 protein, suggesting ces-1 may be transcriptionally regulated directly by ces-2. This element also contains five Snail-like binding sites, suggesting ces-1 may regulate its own transcription. These results suggest that programmed cell death, like many cell fates, is under transcriptional control, and that a transcriptional cascade control the deaths of at least some cells in C. elegans. We propose that some of the ced genes, which are involved in the execution of programmed cell death in C.elegans, are transcriptionally regulated by CES-1 and/or CES-2. Additionally, both ces-1 and ces-2 have homologues which might function in regulating programmed cell death in mammalian cells, suggesting the functions of ces-1 and ces-2 may be evolutionarily conserved.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Mark M. Metzstein.en_US
dc.format.extent208, [1] leavesen_US
dc.format.extent16337502 bytes
dc.format.extent16337259 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of genes involved in cell-specific control of programmed cell death in Caenorhabditis elegansen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Biology
dc.identifier.oclc42458222en_US


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