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dc.contributor.advisorJudith Layzer.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBowen, Brian (Brian Richard)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialn-us-txen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-10T19:12:06Z
dc.date.available2015-06-10T19:12:06Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/97346
dc.descriptionThesis: M.C.P., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 54-61).en_US
dc.description.abstractEnergy efficiency and demand response are critical resources for the transition to a cleaner electricity grid. Demand-side management programs can reduce electricity use during peak times when power is scarce and expensive, and they can help to integrate intermittent renewable energy resources by balancing real-time supply and demand for electricity. These programs are more cost-effective than large-scale energy storage technologies and are particularly important in cities and states with strong climate change and energy goals. Since 2000, Austin Energy has managed a residential demand response program that enables it to reduce air conditioning usage by remotely adjusting thermostat settings at tens of thousands of homes. The utility distributed free thermostats to households that participated in this program; however, by 2012, it determined that only one third of them were working as intended. During the summer of 2013, Austin Energy decided to implement a new program utilizing new technology, Wi-Fi connected "smart" thermostats. Instead of providing free thermostats to reduce peak demand, the utility encouraged residents to bring their own device and receive a one-time $85 enrollment incentive. This thesis analyzes these two approaches to residential demand response as measured by program enrollment rates and participant performance during demand response events. In addition, it assesses the smart thermostats' ability to reduce energy consumption (i.e. improve energy efficiency) over the course of the summer. My analysis indicates that smart thermostats were more effective at reducing peak demand than the free thermostats employed in the previous program. However, homes with smart thermostats used more energy for air conditioning over the course of the summer than homes without, indicating limited energy efficiency potential from smart thermostats among the study population.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Brian Bowen.en_US
dc.format.extent61 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleClimate control : smart thermostats, demand response, and energy efficiency in Austin, Texasen_US
dc.title.alternativeSmart thermostats, demand response, and energy efficiency in Austin, Texasen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc910522643en_US


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