Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSteven D. Eppinger and Charles H. Fine.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNovak, Sharon (Economist)en_US
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-19T20:04:40Z
dc.date.available2005-08-19T20:04:40Z
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/9773
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management, 1999.en_US
dc.description"June 1999."en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (leaves 83-84).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe first paper presents a model of the supply organization problem in the automotive industry that characterizes both ownership of and access to productive assets. Contracting between a manufacturing firm and a parts supplier is modeled using an incomplete contracting framework that synthesizes those of Grossman-Hart (1986) and Rajan-Zingales (1998). Optimal assignments of ownership and access at key milestones in the product development process are analyzed with respect to their incentive effects on non contractible investment. The merits of this approach are argued using case study evidence from an original five year study of parts contracting in the automotive industry. By incorporating quantifiable measures of design complexity from the product development literature, this model also lends itself to more refined testing of vertical integration behavior in a broad range of industries. The second paper focuses on the coupling of product architecture and sourcing decisions using empirical evidence from the auto industry. The emphasis is on two decisions that a firm must make: whether to manufacture products in-house or to outsource - the make/buy decision, and on product complexity. There has been much research into product architecture and the make/buy decision in the auto industry, yet to the best of the authors' knowledge these decisions have never been studied jointly. The central hypothesis is that increasing complexity in product architecture will drive vertical integration, in that a firm seeking to minimize the coordination costs associated with developing a complex part will internalize production. This proposition is consistent with transaction cost theory regarding asset specificity. Product architectural complexity is proposed as a better proxy for asset specificity than those used previously in empirical testing of transaction costs. Original data is used to test an empirical model of the link between product architectural complexity and make/buy decisions within the context of automobile systems development. Results provide evidence of complementarity between product architectural complexity and vertical integration, as well as evidence of clustering within the auto industry around high performance combinations of the two choice variables. This has implications for optimal incentive structures within firms as well as for interpreting the performance outcomes of firms.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Sharon Novak.en_US
dc.format.extent84 leavesen_US
dc.format.extent5955564 bytes
dc.format.extent5955323 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subjectSloan School of Managementen_US
dc.titleSourcing by design : product architecture and the supply chainen_US
dc.title.alternativeProduct architecture and the supply chainen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Managementen_US
dc.identifier.oclc42810426en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record