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dc.contributor.advisorEthan Zuckerman.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBarabas, Chelsea (Chelsea Marie)en_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Comparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-31T19:12:26Z
dc.date.available2015-07-31T19:12:26Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/97992
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Comparative Media Studies, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 177-183).en_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, a significant amount of resources and attention has been directed at increasing the diversity of the hi-tech workforce in the United States. Generally speaking, the underrepresentation of minorities and women in tech has been understood as an "educational pipeline problem," - for a variety of reasons, these groups lack the social supports and resources needed to develop marketable technical literacies. In this thesis I complicate the educational pipeline narrative by taking a close look at the perspectives and practices of three different groups. First, I explore widespread assumptions and recruitment practices found in the tech industry, based on interviews I conducted with over a dozen leaders and founders of tech companies. I found that widespread notions of what merit looks like (in terms of prior work experience and educational pedigree) have given rise to insular hiring practices in tech. Second, I offer an in-depth examination of the risks and opportunities related to an emerging set of practices termed "algorithmic recruitment," which combines machine learning with big data sets in order to evaluate technical talent. Finally, I analyze the strategies adopted by a non-profit called CODE2040 in order to facilitate structural changes in how tech recruits talent to include a more diverse set of qualified applicants. I conclude by offering a more robust conceptualization of diversity and its value in the tech sector, as well as some specific ways to increase tech's diversity in the future.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Chelsea Barabas.en_US
dc.format.extent183 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectComparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.titleEngineering the American dream : a study of bias and perceptions of merit in the high-tech labor marketen_US
dc.title.alternativePaths to prosperity : a study of diversity in techen_US
dc.title.alternativeStudy of bias and perceptions of merit in the high-tech labor marketen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Comparative Media Studies.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc914469445en_US


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