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dc.contributor.advisorGeoffrey S. D. Beach.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBauer, Uwe, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-02T15:17:28Z
dc.date.available2015-09-02T15:17:28Z
dc.date.copyright2014en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/98317
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, February 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 211-223).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe physical and chemical properties of nanoscale materials derive largely from structure and composition at interfaces. The possibility to electrically modify these interfacial characteristics would provide a powerful means to control material properties. Of particular recent scientific and technological interest are metal/metal-oxide bilayers, in which properties as varied as catalytic activity, charge and spin transport, ionic exchange, mechanical behavior, thermal conductivity, and magnetism all depend sensitively on oxygen stoichiometry and defect structure at the metal/metal-oxide interface. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics through electric-field-induced oxygen transport and electrochemical interface reactions paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we focus on ferromagnetic metal/metal-oxide bilayers that exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy derived from interfacial oxygen hybridization. In these materials, we directly observe, in situ voltage-driven oxygen migration at room temperature and show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. By engineering the electrode and metal-oxide layers for efficient ionic exchange and transport, we improve the response time by six orders of magnitude and switch perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at the millisecond timescale. Based on this magneto-ionic coupling mechanism we demonstrate a printer-like system to reversible pattern magnetic properties and realize a prototype nonvolatile memory device in which voltage-controlled domain wall traps facilitate electrical bit selection in a magnetic nanowire register. Moreover, we report on voltage control over electronic transport properties in the same bilayer structures and show that solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry provides a path towards voltage-gating the wide range of phenomena governed by metal/oxide interfaces.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Uwe Bauer.en_US
dc.format.extent223 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectMaterials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.titleVoltage programmable materialsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc919007175en_US


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