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dc.contributor.advisorOlivier L. de Weck.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, Kokien_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-17T17:42:24Z
dc.date.available2015-09-17T17:42:24Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/98557
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 139-145).en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research develops a dynamic logistics network formulation for high-level lifecycle optimization of space mission sequences in order to find an optimal space transportation architecture considering its technology trades over time. The proposed methodology is inspired by terrestrial logistics analysis techniques based on linear programming network optimization. A new model with a generalized multi-commodity network flow formulation and a time-expanded network is developed for dynamic space logistics optimization. The developed methodology is applied to three case studies: 1) human exploration of Mars; 2) human exploration of a near-Earth object (NEO); 3) their combination (related to the concept of the Flexible Path). The results reveal multiple dynamic system-level trades over time and provide recommendations for an optimal strategy for human space exploration architecture. The considered trades include those between in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) and propulsion technologies as well as orbit and depot location selection over time. The numerical results show that using specific combinations of propulsion technologies, ISRU, and other space infrastructure elements effectively, we can reduce the initial mass in low- Earth orbit (IMLEO) by 45-50% compared with the baseline architecture. In addition, the analysis results also show that we can achieve 15-20% IMLEO reduction by designing Mars and NEO missions together as a campaign compared with designing them separately owing to their common space logistics infrastructure pre-deployment. This research serves as a precursor for eventual permanent settlement and colonization of other planets by humans, thus transforming us into a multi-planet species.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Koki Ho.en_US
dc.format.extent145 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectAeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.titleDynamic network modeling for spaceflight logistics with time-expanded networksen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
dc.identifier.oclc920684579en_US


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