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dc.contributor.advisorKeith A. Nelson.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEliason, Jeffrey Kristianen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Chemistry.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-17T19:14:26Z
dc.date.available2015-09-17T19:14:26Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/98819
dc.descriptionThesis: Ph. D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 109-119).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe laser-based transient grating technique was used to study phonon mediated thermal transport in bulk and nanostructured semiconductors and surface wave propagation in a monolayer of micron sized spheres. In the transient grating technique two picosecond pulses are crossed to generate a spatially periodic intensity profile. The spatially periodic profile generates a material excitation with a well-defined wave vector. The time dependence of the spatially periodic material response is measured by monitoring the diffracted signal of an incident probe beam. Non-diffusive thermal transport was observed in thin Si membranes as well as bulk GaAs at relatively short (micron) transient grating periods. First-principles calculations of the phonon mean free paths in Si and GaAs were compared with experimental results and showed good agreement. Preliminary measurements on promising thermoelectric materials such as PbTe and Bi2Te3 are presented showing evidence of non-diffusive transport at short length scales. The transient grating technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity of Si membranes with thickness ranging from 15 nm to 1518 nm. Using the Fuchs-Sondheimer suppression function along with first-principles results, the thermal conductivity as a function of membrane thickness was calculated. The calculations showed excellent agreement with experimental measurements. A convex optimization algorithm was employed to reconstruct the phonon mean free path distribution from experimental measurements. This marks the first experimental determination of the mean free path distribution for a bulk material. Thermal conductivity measurements at low temperatures in a 200 nm Si membrane indicate the breakdown of the diffuse boundary scattering approximation. The transient grating technique was used to generate surface acoustic waves and measure their dispersion in a monolayer of 0.5 - 1 [mu]m diameter silica spheres. The measured dispersion curves show "avoided crossing" behavior due to the interaction between an axial contact resonance of the microspheres and the surface acoustic wave at a frequency of -200MHz for the 1 [mu]m spheres and -700 MHz for the 0.5 [m spheres. The experimental measurements were fit with an analytical model in which the contact stiffness was the only fitting parameter. Preliminary results of surface acoustic wave propagation in microsphere waveguides, transmission through a microsphere strip, and evidence of a nonlinear response in a 2D array of microspheres are presented.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Jeffrey Kristian Eliason.en_US
dc.format.extent119 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectChemistry.en_US
dc.titleOptical transient grating measurements of micro/nanoscale thermal transport and mechanical propertiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Chemistry.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc921148462en_US


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