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dc.contributor.advisorJohn Van Maanen.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMills, Thomas W. (Thomas Wayne)en_US
dc.contributor.otherSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-29T18:59:20Z
dc.date.available2015-09-29T18:59:20Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/99033
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Management of Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of Management, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 62-64).en_US
dc.description.abstractAround the world, the name Intel is synonymous with personal computers. Since the early 1980s nearly all personal computers, and more recently servers, are designed with a microprocessor based on Intel's x86 architecture. Over the last decade, however, the industry has seen many changes, and current trends send strong signals to Intel that it must continue the evolution of its own internal corporate innovation process-one that has driven Intel's success for many years-or suffer potential negative consequences. The reality is that for almost 40 years, personal computers have remained relatively the same; all had the same open modular architecture originally designed by IBM in the early 1980s. However, the past few years have seen a wave of evolution that includes embedded computing driven by the growth of digital devices like tablets and smartphones. These changes are of major importance to Intel. Instead of using the workhorse standard x86 processor, digital devices today have a chipset optimized for that device's specific application. This hardware change is further complicated by the shift to cloud computing and data centers. Change within the semiconductor industry, and specifically for Intel, is requisite and inevitable. Today, the firm is investing heavily in its future. Part of this investment is an initiative called Open Innovation 2.0, undertaken in Ireland under the umbrella of Intel Labs Europe. This innovation demonstrates Intel's commitment to evolving its corporate innovation processes to meet the needs of today's customers as well as future customers, markets, and industries. It must be said, however, that some technology-based innovation luminaries and academics believe Open Innovation (OI) is nothing new but merely the latest repackaged fad in innovation. In this thesis I evaluate how Intel developed its 01 initiative and then assess the levels of success achieved to date and planned for the future. History will show if OI is a useful innovation tool and whether Intel can maintain its reputation in the volatile field of digital computing.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Thomas W. Mills.en_US
dc.format.extent64 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.titleIntel Corporation -- Intel Labs Europe : open innovation 2.0en_US
dc.title.alternativeIntel Labs Europe : open innovation 2.0en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Management of Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSloan School of Management.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc921387966en_US


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