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dc.contributor.advisorBishwapriya Sanyal.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRajashekar, Anirudh Ven_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.coverage.spatiala-ii---en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-29T19:02:40Z
dc.date.available2015-09-29T19:02:40Z
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/99090
dc.descriptionThesis: M.C.P., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, 2015.en_US
dc.description"June 2015." Cataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 99-104).en_US
dc.description.abstractWhile there is an increasing acceptance in academic literature about the importance of informal water delivery in cities around the developing world, public opinion is often divided. Many citizens see informal water vendors as businesses controlled by extortionary "mafias" and call for government regulation. This thesis explores whether government regulation is justified in the case of Bangalore, India where water issues have become increasingly pressing and informal water vendors, also known as the "water mafia," have grown in number and in influence. In particular, this thesis will explore whether private tankers display any form of anti-competitive behavior by addressing two questions: 1) Do private water tankers exhibit monopoly power, and 2) Do private water tanker prices vary depending on the characteristics of the customers they serve? Evidence collected in July-August 2014 and January 2015 indicates that tankers do not operate in an anti-competitive manner and that government intervention is not justified on these grounds. However, tankers do contribute to declining groundwater levels and government intervention on these grounds ought to be explored.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Anirudh Rajashekar.en_US
dc.format.extent122 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectUrban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.titleDo private water tankers in Bangalore exhibit "mafia-like" behavior?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeM.C.P.en_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Urban Studies and Planning.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc922043397en_US


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