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dc.contributor.advisorLeslie K. Norford.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNakano, Aikoen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-14T14:35:37Z
dc.date.available2015-10-14T14:35:37Z
dc.date.copyright2015en_US
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/99251
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Building Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture, 2015.en_US
dc.descriptionThis electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from student-submitted PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 125-131).en_US
dc.description.abstractUrban Weather Generator (UWG) is the urban design simulation tool that provides climate-specific advice for cityscape geometry and land use to assist the development of energy-efficient cities that are also thermally comfortable. The software enables urban designers to parametrically test built densities for masterplanning and urban planners to advocate zoning regulations such as building height and land use as well as policies for traffic intensity with energy and thermal implications of these interventions. UWG is the first tool publicly available that incorporates microclimatic considerations in urban design and energy simulations. The project succeeds the work of Bueno et al. (2014) to develop a useful and accessible urban design tool to model urban heat island effect (UHI) from measurements at an operational weather station based on neighborhood-scale energy balances. The sensitivity analyses for Boston, MA, USA, and Punggol, Singapore identify as key parameters the building morphologies such as site coverage ratio and fac̦ade-to-site ratio; building surface albedo and emissivity; and sensible anthropogenic heat in the urban canyon. The consistency of results for these cities reduced required user inputs to the model by 46% without decreasing the simulation accuracy. The developed software is available as a stand-alone tool as well as a new plug-in for the Rhinoceros-based urban modeling interface (umi) to integrate the microclimate analysis in the formal design process. The graphical user interface is written in programming language C# in the Microsoft .NET platform and is available free of charge at http://urbanmicroclimate.scripts.mit.edu/uwg.php. The newly proposed workflow for energy- and thermal comfort-driven urban design and planning is demonstrated through a case study of the new 130 thousand square meter development on the MIT East Campus in Cambridge, MA, USA. An IPCC-based climate change prediction is considered along with UHI to evaluate the proposed massing models at each design phase to ensure thermally comfortable urban development along the way.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Aiko Nakano.en_US
dc.format.extent141 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsM.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectArchitecture.en_US
dc.titleUrban weather generator user interface development : towards a usable tool for integrating urban heat island effect within urban design processen_US
dc.title.alternativeTowards a usable tool for integrating urban heat island effect within urban design processen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Building Technologyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Architecture.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc922926670en_US


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