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dc.contributor.advisorMarcia Bartusiak.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPhares, Madeleine Margauxen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-30T19:17:12Z
dc.date.available2017-01-30T19:17:12Z
dc.date.copyright2016en_US
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/106762
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Science Writing, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Humanities, Graduate Program in Science Writing, 2016.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 24-26).en_US
dc.description.abstractThe potential of electricity to improve the brain has captivated many. Electrical gadgets attract the rich and the poor, the educated and uneducated, the scientist and the charlatan. Over hundreds of years, people have tried everything from shocking away headaches with live torpedo fish, to bombarding patients' brains with so much current that their bodies convulse. A more innocuous technology has since emerged: transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS. All it takes to build is a small battery, two wires, two electrodes, and salt water. The idea is that by priming the brain with a mild electrical current, an incoming stimulus would be easier to process. In other words: less mental effort to learn something new, like recovering from a stroke or improving ski jump performance. Three primary communities are interested in tDCS today: do-it-yourselfers, clinical researchers, and neurotechnology companies. They want it for different reasons, and yet they are still wary of one another. But tDCS, in all of its simplicity, is actually not so simple-and neither is the human brain. What makes it so appealing to so many people of so many different backgrounds? How does it work? And does it deliver?en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Madeleine Margaux Phares.en_US
dc.format.extent24 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectGraduate Program in Science Writing.en_US
dc.titleYour brain on 9 volts : the specter and hype of electrical brain stimulationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Science Writingen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Graduate Program in Science Writing.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc969769087en_US


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