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Synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanorings for neuronal stimulation

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dc.contributor.advisor Polina Anikeeva. en_US
dc.contributor.author Garcia, Francisco J., S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2017-09-15T15:30:05Z
dc.date.available 2017-09-15T15:30:05Z
dc.date.copyright 2017 en_US
dc.date.issued 2017 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/111345
dc.description Thesis: S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 2017. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (pages 32-33). en_US
dc.description.abstract Magnetic nanorings (MNRs) are anisotropic nanomaterials that can support a magnetic vortex state, which can yield both colloidal stability and large hysteretic power losses when exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Coupled with the biocompatibility of polymer surface coatings, MNRs have the potential of being used for many biological applications, including neuronal stimulation, drug delivery, and cancer hyperthermia. In this work, we synthesized varying geometries of MNRs via a thermal decomposition route and characterize their structural, chemical, and magnetothermal properties. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy was used to analyze surface morphology and geometry of nanostructures. X-ray diffraction allowed for differentiation of paramagnetic and ferrimagentic phases of synthesized iron oxide. Vibrating scanning magnetometry and induced coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy were used to determine magnetic properties, including saturation magnetization (Ms) and coercive field (He). Finally, calorimetric measurements were performed to calculate specific power losses (SLPs) of varying compositions of MNRs. We demonstrate that MNRs exhibit hysteretic power loss and can be optimized for neuronal stimulation under biologically safe AMF conditions. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Francisco J. Garcia. en_US
dc.format.extent 33 pages en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights MIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.title Synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanorings for neuronal stimulation en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.B. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 1003290970 en_US


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