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dc.contributor.advisorAndrea Chegut.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBando Hano, Alfredo Keitaroen_US
dc.contributor.otherMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Center for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Development.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-08T19:48:21Z
dc.date.available2018-08-08T19:48:21Z
dc.date.copyright2018en_US
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/117306
dc.descriptionThesis: S.M. in Real Estate Development, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Real Estate Development in conjunction with the Center for Real Estate, 2018.en_US
dc.descriptionCataloged from PDF version of thesis.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (pages 58-61).en_US
dc.description.abstractSmart buildings have grown from an increase in digital technologies that can sense, recognize and verify the experiences of the building and its inhabitants. Nascent literature has identified what it means to be considered smart. Buildings must respond to all three components of systems, performance, and service and has to have the following components: a) Smartness and technology awareness, b) economic and cost efficiency, c) personal and social sensitivity and d) environmental responsiveness. Yet, it is unclear whether these systems have any value to the users or its owners. This thesis studies the economic impact of Smart, Connected and Green buildings upon rents and transaction prices. Using numerous data sources, we identify buildings that offer at least one so-called "smart" amenity and link them with the building's achieved rent and transactions prices as well as to other so-called "innovation" amenities, like greenness and or fiber-lit connectivity. Results documented in this study suggest that buildings that offer a more integral solution (i.e. buildings that are Smart, Connected and Green) have a premium in both rents and transaction prices over similar office products. While products that offer a more disintegrated solution have a smaller premium or even no incremental value premium, with the exception of green only buildings that offers a premium by themselves. This study contributes to the vast literature on real estate innovation but explores particularly the recent commercial office products that are Smart Buildings.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityby Alfredo Keitaro Bando Hano.en_US
dc.format.extent68 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technologyen_US
dc.rightsMIT theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed, downloaded, or printed from this source but further reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582en_US
dc.subjectCenter for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Development.en_US
dc.titleThe incremental value of smart buildings upon effective rents and transaction pricesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeS.M. in Real Estate Developmenten_US
dc.contributor.departmentMassachusetts Institute of Technology. Center for Real Estate. Program in Real Estate Development.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc1045068873en_US


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