Advanced Search
DSpace@MIT

Integrated optimization model for airline schedule design : profit maximization and issues of access for small markets

Research and Teaching Output of the MIT Community

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor John-Paul Clarke. en_US
dc.contributor.author Garcia, Flora A., 1979- en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2005-09-26T19:38:57Z
dc.date.available 2005-09-26T19:38:57Z
dc.date.copyright 2004 en_US
dc.date.issued 2004 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/28299
dc.description Thesis (S.M. in Transportation)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Technology and Policy Program, 2004. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 99-100). en_US
dc.description.abstract The purpose of the National Airspace System Strategy Simulator is to provide the FAA with a decision support system to evaluate long-term infrastructure and regulatory strategies. The NAS strategy simulator consists of several modules representing the different entities within the NAS embedded in a system dynamics framework. The MIT Airline Scheduling Module is the module within the NAS Strategy Simulator that represents the decision making process of the airlines with respect to the schedules that they fly. The MIT Airline Scheduling Module is an incremental optimization tool to determine schedule changes from one time step to another that best meets demand using available resources. The optimization model combines an Integrated Schedule Design and Fleet Assignment model and a model, based on Passenger Decision Window model, that determines passenger preference for itineraries. We simultaneously establish frequency, departure times, fleet assignment, passenger loads and revenue within a competitive environment. Optimization methods often lead to extreme schedule decisions such as eliminating service to markets, often small markets, that are not financially profitable for the airlines. This is of grave concern to government policy makers as rural access to markets, goods and services is a politically charged subject. The issue is to understand what is likely to happen in small communities if the government doesn't respond in some way and how much subsidy, if any, would it be necessary to encourage airlines to maintain service in these markets. The approach we will use is based on economic policy and cost-benefit analysis. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Flora A. Garcia. en_US
dc.format.extent 100 p. en_US
dc.format.extent 4427821 bytes
dc.format.extent 4439324 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Technology and Policy Program. en_US
dc.subject Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.title Integrated optimization model for airline schedule design : profit maximization and issues of access for small markets en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.description.degree S.M.in Transportation en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Program. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 55589672 en_US


Files in this item

Name Size Format Description
55589672.pdf 5.110Mb PDF Preview, non-printable (open to all)
55589672-MIT.pdf 5.105Mb PDF Full printable version (MIT only)

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

MIT-Mirage