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An agent-based approach to HIV/AIDS epidemic modeling : a case study of Papua New Guinea

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dc.contributor.advisor Nathaniel Osgood and Fred Moavenzadeh. en_US
dc.contributor.author Rhee, Alisa Joy en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.coverage.spatial a-pp--- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2006-11-07T12:45:31Z
dc.date.available 2006-11-07T12:45:31Z
dc.date.copyright 2006 en_US
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/34528
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Engineering Systems Division, Technology and Policy Program; and, (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2006. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 91-95). en_US
dc.description.abstract Since AIDS was first discovered, mathematical models of the transmission dynamics of HIV have been developed to determine the drivers of the epidemic. It has become apparent that the most profound factor in the proliferation of this disease is the aggregate effects of individual behavior and perception of risk. Agent-based models (ABM) allow one to simulate the social and sexual interactions which may describe the societal context in which HIV may spread. Using this framework, I construct a simplified social and sexual network that represents Papua New Guinea. This country is used as a case study because it illustrates extremes in network topology. Papua New Guinea is characterized by geographic isolation of ethnic groups, such that ideas of behavior change, stigma reduction, and safe sex practices may spread very slowly. Furthermore, sexual networks in Papua New Guinea are complex and sexual violence and cultural practices may amplify the rate at which HIV is spread. Ultimately, the purpose of HIV transmission models is to hypothesize about drivers of the epidemic which will then shed light on appropriate interventions and prevention measures. ABMs facilitate the development of network-based public health interventions. Such interventions, like home-based care programs, may have great promise in Papua New Guinea. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Alisa Joy Rhee. en_US
dc.format.extent 133 p. en_US
dc.format.extent 6729976 bytes
dc.format.extent 6735521 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Technology and Policy Program. en_US
dc.subject Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.title An agent-based approach to HIV/AIDS epidemic modeling : a case study of Papua New Guinea en_US
dc.title.alternative Agent-based approach to Human T-lymphotropic virus/Acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic modeling : a case study of Papua New Guinea en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Technology and Policy Program. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 70924860 en_US


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