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The State Machine : politics, ideology, and computation in Chile, 1964-1973

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dc.contributor.advisor David A. Mindell. en_US
dc.contributor.author Miller Medina, Jessica Eden en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-10-19T20:26:47Z
dc.date.available 2007-10-19T20:26:47Z
dc.date.copyright 2005 en_US
dc.date.issued 2005 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/39176
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D. in History and Social Study of Science and Technology (HASTS))--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Science, Technology and Society, 2005. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (v. 2, leaves 343-392). en_US
dc.description.abstract This dissertation argues that Chile's history of computing is tightly interwoven with the history of the Chilean state. It begins by documenting the government use of mechanical tabulating machines during the 1920s and 1930s and concludes with the disbanding of the state computer enterprise known as ECOM in 1991. The dissertation pays particular attention to the period between 1964 and 1973, which was marked by the presidencies of Christian Democrat Eduardo Frei Montalva and Socialist Salvador Allende Gossens. The dissertation addresses three central questions. First, it asks how Chilean economic policies and political events shaped the country's technological history. Second, it asks what we can learn from computers if we treat them as texts for understanding historical processes in Chile, the Latin American region, and the developing world. Finally, it addresses how Chile's political leaders used computing machines in their attempts to control Chile's social, economic, and political development and to forward their plans to modernize the Chilean nation. It argues that computers proved valuable not only in producing the Chile of today but in articulating national goals that changed over time. en_US
dc.description.abstract (cont.) Government, use of computers both reflected and made possible the ideological programs of developmentalism, socialism, and neoliberalism that dominated Chilean politics during the period under study. Based predominantly on archival research and oral history interviews, the dissertation follows a narrative format. It shows how computing technologies contributed to the practice of statecraft, influenced ideas of modernization, and reflected the tensions between Chile and the industrialized nations of the developed world. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Jessica Eden Miller Medina. en_US
dc.format.extent 2 v. (392 leaves) en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Program in Science, Technology and Society. en_US
dc.title The State Machine : politics, ideology, and computation in Chile, 1964-1973 en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D.in History and Social Study of Science and Technology (HASTS en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Program in Science, Technology and Society. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 62715819 en_US


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