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Effect of directed port air flow on liquid fuel transport in a port fuel injected spark ignition engine

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dc.contributor.advisor Wai K. Cheng. en_US
dc.contributor.author Scaringe, Robert J. (Robert Joseph) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2008-01-10T15:52:01Z
dc.date.available 2008-01-10T15:52:01Z
dc.date.copyright 2007 en_US
dc.date.issued 2007 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/39889
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, 2007. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 65-67). en_US
dc.description.abstract With highly efficient modem catalysts, startup HC emissions have become a significant portion of the trip total. Liquid fuel is a major source of HC emissions during the cold start and fast idle period. Thus the control of liquid fuel, particularly during startup, is required for future engine designs. The effect of a turbulence plate, or charge motion control valve, on the port liquid fuel mass is examined. A purging process was used to examine the effect of a charge motion control plate on the port fuel film mass. It was found that the charge motion plate can provide substantial reductions in both the total and downstream intake fuel film mass. These reductions are the result of the increased intake turbulence that results from the charge motion plate. This increased turbulence provides enhanced fuel - air mixing and increases port film strip atomization due to the increased viscous shear. The effect of different film locations was postulated and backed experimentally. The downstream and valve films have the most immediate effect on the fuel delivery. Large upstream films, which can take thousands of cycles to develop, influence the fuel delivery on a much longer time scale. en_US
dc.description.abstract (cont.) In-cylinder hydrocarbon measurements were made. Despite the high level of scatter in the measurements, similar transient responses were observed for both CMCV open and closed. This similarity despite different film masses was attributed to different t and x values. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Robert J. Scaringe. en_US
dc.format.extent 71 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582
dc.subject Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.title Effect of directed port air flow on liquid fuel transport in a port fuel injected spark ignition engine en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 182540691 en_US


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