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New potentials for "independent" music : social networks, old and new, and the ongoing struggles to reshape the music industry

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dc.contributor.advisor William Uricchio. en_US
dc.contributor.author Wendel, Evan Landon en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Comparative Media Studies. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2008-11-07T19:14:35Z
dc.date.available 2008-11-07T19:14:35Z
dc.date.copyright 2008 en_US
dc.date.issued 2008 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/43197
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Comparative Media Studies, 2008. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 105-111). en_US
dc.description.abstract This thesis explores the evolving nature of independent music practices in the context of offline and online social networks. The pivotal role of social networks in the cultural production of music is first examined by treating an independent record label of the post-punk era as an offline social network. This develops a useful framework for then considering the similar and distinctive ways in which contemporary independent practices are enabled and/or shaped by online social networks. Analysis is based on close, comparative readings of the structures and affordances of two case studies: the UK-based Rough Trade record label (1978 - 1991) and MySpace (2003 - present). Numerous examples of artists and their practices are drawn upon to illustrate how discursive meanings of independence are negotiated within each network. Investigated are potentials for realizing not only autonomy from the mainstream music industry, but also a range of other post-punk ideals tied to a broader independent ethos concerned with issues of access and participation, artistic control and freedom, as well as desires to engender more diverse music cultures. The intersection of offline and online networks in the context of today's dynamic, transitional music industry further provides new opportunities for more meaningful artist-to-artist, artist-to-fan, and artist-to-company/label interactions. By emphasizing the centrality of social networks, conceptions of autonomous, "do-it-yourself" music making are problematized in favor of "do-it-together" understandings that foreground cooperation. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Evan Landon Wendel. en_US
dc.format.extent 112 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Comparative Media Studies. en_US
dc.title New potentials for "independent" music : social networks, old and new, and the ongoing struggles to reshape the music industry en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Comparative Media Studies. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 256929823 en_US


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