Advanced Search
DSpace@MIT

Infofield : an aura recognizing digital information of everyday environment

Research and Teaching Output of the MIT Community

Planned maintenance alert - Monday, April 21: DSpace@MIT will undergo maintenance activities that will affect service availability and access to file content. While the service interruptions should be brief, access to file content may take longer to restore. Status updates will be posted to http://3down.mit.edu/.

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Henry Holtzman. en_US
dc.contributor.author Lee, Sanghoon, S. M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Program in Media Arts and Sciences en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2009-08-26T17:15:44Z
dc.date.available 2009-08-26T17:15:44Z
dc.date.copyright 2008 en_US
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/46666
dc.description Thesis (S.M.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and Planning, Program in Media Arts and Sciences, 2009. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (leaves 62-64). en_US
dc.description.abstract Many ubiquitous computing scenarios are enabled by the ability to detect and identify objects in a user's environment, and recently Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) has been considered an affordable technology for providing such ability. However, RFID approaches have been flawed: when they operate at long range, they fail to provide adequate context as to which tagged objects are the subject of the user's interest; and when tuned for short range operation, they require the user to explicitly scan the tagged object. In addition, the knowledge gained from the user interacting with the object is limited to identification. This thesis proposes an ambient metaphor for detecting daily environments suitable for the upcoming far-field UHF RFID infrastructure. A user carries a mobile RFID reader, which creates a sphere of detection field to monitor RFID tags surrounding the user. The reader silently monitors the objects and functions as an agent that supports the user's consciousness of events happening outside of the user's attention. With sensor-enhanced RFID tags, our system does not limit itself to identification, but also provides the status of the corresponding item. The data from the sensors are used to distinguish a tag in a multiple tag environment and to describe the interactions between the user and the host object. This improves the selectivity and the context-awareness of the system. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Sanghoon Lee. en_US
dc.format.extent 69 leaves en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.title Infofield : an aura recognizing digital information of everyday environment en_US
dc.title.alternative Aura recognizing digital information of everyday environment en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree S.M. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Architecture. Program in Media Arts and Sciences. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 428087512 en_US


Files in this item

Name Size Format Description
428087512.pdf 28.23Mb PDF Preview, non-printable (open to all)
428087512-MIT.pdf 28.23Mb PDF Full printable version (MIT only)

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

MIT-Mirage