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Economic and technological advantages of using high speed sintering as a rapid manufacturing alternative in footwear applications

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dc.contributor.advisor Kim Blair and Edwin Thomas. en_US
dc.contributor.author Vasquez, Mike (George Mike) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-25T15:19:13Z
dc.date.available 2010-03-25T15:19:13Z
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/53238
dc.description Thesis (M. Eng.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, 2009. en_US
dc.description "May 2009." Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 52-54). en_US
dc.description.abstract Rapid manufacturing is a family of technologies that employ additive layer deposition techniques to construct parts from computer based design models.[2] These parts can then be used as prototypes or finished goods. One type of rapid manufacturing technology, Selective Laser Sintering, only allows for a point-by-point sintering process to construct the 3D representations of CAD models. This makes for long processing periods and is ineffective for high volume manufacturing. However, a new process called high-speed sintering uses infrared energy to 'flash' the polymer powder at multiple points making the layer deposition process much more time efficient. In effect each infusion of energy results in an entire layer being constructed rather than a single point. One of the first industrial applications for this technique is in performance footwear manufacturing. New Balance, a Boston based shoe and apparel company, in collaboration with Loughborough University has an interest in exploring the technology for low volume parts manufacturing as well as personalized footwear. High speed sintering has the potential to replace injection molding for specific footwear and non-footwear applications. This technology has several key advantages over injection molding including the ability to build complex geometries that would be impossible with injection molding. Also as the technology continues to evolve new materials could improve the mechanical performance of finished parts. Nevertheless, as with commercializing any new technology identifying a cost effective implementation route is a pivotal step. en_US
dc.description.abstract (cont.) This project addressed this concern by thoroughly investigating the current and potential state of high speed sintering. The manufacture of a New Balance shoe part using both high speed sintering and injection molding was directly compared. Several factors including time to manufacture and cost were investigated. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Mike Vasquez. en_US
dc.format.extent 54 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.title Economic and technological advantages of using high speed sintering as a rapid manufacturing alternative in footwear applications en_US
dc.title.alternative Advantages of using high speed sintering as a rapid manufacturing alternative in footwear applications en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree M.Eng. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 535713405 en_US


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