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Adipogenesis and angiogenesis : roles in tissue engineering and glucose metabolism

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dc.contributor.advisor Rakesh K. Jain. en_US
dc.contributor.author Tam, Joshua en_US
dc.contributor.other Harvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-04-28T17:06:07Z
dc.date.available 2010-04-28T17:06:07Z
dc.date.copyright 2009 en_US
dc.date.issued 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/54590
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.)--Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, 2009. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 118-127). en_US
dc.description.abstract Adipose tissue serves two main functions in the body: (1) it is the body's primary energy depot; and (2) it also serves as an important endocrine organ, producing and secreting various enzymes, growth factors, cytokines, and hormones. Both of these functions require ample access to circulating blood. Many aspects of angiogenesis during adipose tissue expansion remain poorly understood. Adipocytes produce a large variety of molecules involved in angiogenesis, and obesity is associated with elevated circulating levels of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Our lab has previously shown that angiogenesis and adipogenesis are mutually dependent via a VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-mediated mechanism. Since then several other studies have reinforced a role for the VEGF-VEGFR system in energy metabolism. For example, genetically obese mice treated with anti-VEGF antibody had lower fat pad weights, but the VEGF receptor responsible for this observation is not known. There is also disagreement on the cell type(s) responsible for fat tissue's angiogenic capability, with some studies supporting a dominant role for adipocytes, while others attribute most of the angiogenic capacity to the adipose tissue stromal cells (ASC). This thesis project aimed to fill some of these gaps by examining the angiogenic capacity of adipose tissue relative to other tissues, the effects of VEGFR-1 and R-2 blockade in mouse models of adipogenesis and diet-induced obesity, the respective angiogenic capabilities of adipocytes and ASC, and the possibility of harnessing the angiogenic potential of adipose tissue for vascular tissue engineering. en_US
dc.description.abstract (cont.) In addition, a physiologically-based mathematical model was developed to simulate the regulatory effects of the leptin pathway on murine energy homeostasis. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Joshua Tam. en_US
dc.format.extent 127 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Harvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.title Adipogenesis and angiogenesis : roles in tissue engineering and glucose metabolism en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree Ph.D. en_US
dc.contributor.department Harvard University--MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 569612547 en_US


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