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What would a non-heterosexist city look like? : a theory on queer spaces and the role of planners in creating the inclusive city

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dc.contributor.advisor Larry J. Vale. en_US
dc.contributor.author Nusser, Sarah (Sarah Parker) en_US
dc.contributor.other Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-10-29T13:56:23Z
dc.date.available 2010-10-29T13:56:23Z
dc.date.copyright 2010 en_US
dc.date.issued 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1721.1/59581
dc.description Thesis (M.C.P.)--Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning, 2010. en_US
dc.description This electronic version was submitted by the student author. The certified thesis is available in the Institute Archives and Special Collections. en_US
dc.description Cataloged from student submitted PDF version of thesis. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references (p. 137-139). en_US
dc.description.abstract Planning has always interacted with issues of sexuality, but the failure of the literature to address these practices explicitly has led to the silencing of minority sexualities in planning discourse and the severe marginalization of many queer people in cities. To better understand the experiences of queer people (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) as a basis for creating new planning frameworks that address the realities and diversity of queer lives, this thesis explores how queer people experience everyday space in the city, particularly the places they feel the most and least comfortable being queer. This thesis asks: how do relationships between the design, management, and spatial characteristics of spaces communicate values about sexual orientation and gender identity? How could planners and designers create more inclusive spaces? To accomplish this, in-depth interviews were conducted with queer participants in Kansas City, MO and Cambridge, MA, the progressive cities in their respective regions. I utilize readings on design, politics, and identity to create a Lynchian framework for evaluating spaces based on fit, control, and access. Lastly, I document the performative characteristics of each space identified in interviews with respect to this framework. I draw conclusions from my research findings and discuss the implications for designers and planners and areas for future research. In particular I discuss the process that planners should go through to begin re-constructing the public realm as inclusive of queer sexualities. Finally, I speculate on the kinds of spaces that might exist in a non-heterosexist city. en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibility by Sarah Nusser. en_US
dc.format.extent 139 p. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology en_US
dc.rights M.I.T. theses are protected by copyright. They may be viewed from this source for any purpose, but reproduction or distribution in any format is prohibited without written permission. See provided URL for inquiries about permission. en_US
dc.rights.uri http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582 en_US
dc.subject Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.title What would a non-heterosexist city look like? : a theory on queer spaces and the role of planners in creating the inclusive city en_US
dc.title.alternative Theory on queer spaces and the role of planners in creating the inclusive city en_US
dc.title.alternative Theory of queer spaces and the role of planners in creating the inclusive city en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.description.degree M.C.P. en_US
dc.contributor.department Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning. en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 670598433 en_US


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